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A Texas man that boasts about his hunting ability shows a soft spot for a hummingbird in need.

The man posted a video showing a hummingbird that was completely still other than the slight movement from its breathing. He says that the bird was experiencing heat stroke and he found it incapacitated like this.

The man proceeds to gently pick up the bird and dip its long beak into a class of sugar water. The hummingbird immediately started drinking up the water and seemed to gain back some strength.

The man followed up with a few more videos showing the tiny bird’s recovery. The other videos show the bird sitting up and looking much more attentive and eventually even flying away to a nearby treetop.

During his time watching over the bird, the man shares a bit about him. He mentions that he hunts deer and has no qualms about it. He says how as a hunter, he has no issue killing animals. However, he absolutely loves animals, and seeing this little hummingbird struggling to stay alive, he knew he had to help. He even began tearing up while talking about trying to save the helpless bird.

It is so pure to see a hunter, who you would expect to not care about a little bird, go out of his way to nurse the critter back to health. I love to see all the gooey heartwarming videos like these, it is the type of content that I am primarily on apps like TikTok for.

Take a look at the bird making its way to the top of a tree and waves its goodbye:

Warning: NSFW Language

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