Charlie Brewer and his Baylor Bears came to Lubbock over the weekend for the first Texas Tech-Baylor game in the city in more than a decade.

The Bears took the lead after a pick 6 early in the game and didn't look back. Brewer would lead Baylor to a 13-6 lead at halftime. The veteran QB would then stretch the lead to 20-6 in a toothless dogfight of a third quarter.

After getting to 20 points, Brewer threw an interception, led four drives that ended in punts, and got stuffed at the goal line leading to a field goal. During the same stretch, the Red Raiders scored 18 points, including a final second field goal that would clinch the comeback victory for Texas Tech.

After the game, Brewer's sister Katie tweeted that her brother had received death threats from Baylor "fans" after the team's collapse on the field.

The Baylor program has been through a lot in the last 10 years. From being in the basement to skyrocketing into contention of Big 12 Championships to plummeting back to earth during a scandal that rocked the Big 12. Then Matt Rhule and Charlie Brewer came together and lead Baylor back from the depths to an 11 win season last season.

After Rhule bolted to the NFL in the offseason, Brewer returned for his senior season under heralded new head coach Dave Aranda. The growing pains for Aranda at head coach have been tremendous, leading to a 1-5 start in 2020, with a few brutal losses and a lone win over Kansas.

In football, though, it's nobody's fault more than it's the quarterback's fault. The quarterback gets too much credit when the team wins, and too much blame when a team loses. In some cases, idiotic, depraved, dumb-ass fans seem to think that death threats are appropriate for a collegiate athlete fighting his hardest to win games for his university.

Sure, Brewer's mistakes and shortcomings are glorified because he plays a premium position, but to threaten a player in any way because your team lost is ridiculous. It might seem hypocritical coming from me, a guy who tweets hundreds of times a game, but there's an obvious line when it comes to reaching out to players directly. A death threat crosses that line, drives a few miles, hops in an airplane and then parachutes out into the middle of the ocean.

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